Reported press freedom violations in Black Lives Matter protests near 500

An unprecedented assault on press freedom has been carried out by police since the George Floyd protests started in May.

Book publishing and prior restraint under Trump

“Prior restraint” — or the attempt by individuals or governments to use courts to censor books or newspapers before publication — has become a tool increasingly relied upon by President Trump and his inner circle.

In support of Black lives matter

Freedom of the Press Foundation believes Black lives matter, and we support the efforts of activists and protesters exercising their First Amendment rights to take a stand against police brutality.

Who’s attacking journalists at George Floyd protests? Overwhelmingly, it’s the police.

Over 80% of the assaults on journalists have come from police, not protesters.

Press freedom violations at George Floyd protests by the numbers: a shocking and unprecedented level of attacks on journalists

In the days since the nationwide protests over the killing of George Floyd began in Minneapolis, attacks on journalists and press freedom have been recorded at an unprecedented level. The U.S. Press Freedom Tracker is investigating or has confirmed 242 such incidents—including physical assaults, arrests, damaged equipment, and more.

Minnesota police shockingly arrest CNN reporter on live TV, hit other journalists with tear gas and rubber bullets

This morning, viewers watching CNN for coverage of the ongoing protests in Minneapolis instead witnessed an unbelievable curtailment of press freedom, as an entire film crew was arrested — on air — apparently without even being notified of the cause of their arrest.

Senate blocks crucial internet privacy protections in Patriot Act debate

Despite online privacy concerns at an all-time high, the Senate rejected a critical reform to the Patriot Act yesterday, voting to hand the Trump administration and Attorney General William Barr the ability to spy on Americans’ web browsing habits without a warrant.

Supreme Court goes live in the age of COVID, and rules on press freedom issues

The Supreme Court will take the unprecedented step of broadcasting its oral arguments for two weeks beginning today, enacting in response to the coronavirus pandemic a measure that government transparency advocates have demanded for years.

How’s newsgathering during COVID-19 at the state level? Depends on the governor.

Journalists covering state responses to the coronavirus pandemic are hampered as officials reduce seating in briefing rooms, introduce unreliable technology and, in some cases, refuse real-time questions.