Donate to support transparency and accountability this holiday season

Kevin Gallagher
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‘Tis the season for giving, and here at Freedom of the Press Foundation, we have several options for those who are interested in supporting organizations dedicated to transparency and accountability—all of which are fully tax-deductible in the United States.

Encryption Tools for Journalists

Through our website you can donate to several great encryption tools, including Tails, Open Whisper Systems (creators of TextSecure and RedPhone), and the Tor Project. These are all free and open source tools that are respected by the information security community and help journalists and sources communicate more securely. Their ongoing development, however, is very dependent upon donations, which is why your support can help make these tools better, more secure, and easier to use. You can read more about these tools here.

SecureDrop Crowd-Funding for Independent Organizations

The cost of the hardware that’s required to run SecureDrop leaves smaller independent organizations unable to afford it. That’s why we’re raising money to help four innovative organizations dedicated to transparency purchase the SecureDrop hardware. Then we’ll also help them install it for free. In our first round we have Cryptome, BalkanLeaks, Firedoglake, and the Government Accountability Project. This campaign is close to reaching its goal—you can help them get over the top by going here.

WikiLeaks

We accept donations on behalf of WikiLeaks, the publisher and media organization that came under unjust and extra-legal financial censorship in 2010 and 2011. The banking blockade against WikiLeaks was a major source of inspiration for founding Freedom of the Press Foundation. We believe in providing support to journalism organizations that have been cut off from funding through unofficial government pressure for publishing information in the public interest. Go here to donate now.

Nicky Hager Legal Defense

Independent journalist Nicky Hager's home was raided by the New Zealand police and his reporting equipment was seized after writing an investigative book based on documents from an anonymous source. Please help us crowd-fund for Nicky's legal defense and send a message the New Zealand government that journalists' homes should be off-limits.

The SecureDrop Project

SecureDrop is an open source whistleblower submission system that media organizations can use to securely accept documents from anonymous sources. We’ve been managing its development since late 2013, and have hired two full-time employees on the project. It’s now in operation in over 15 newsrooms. We’re also working on a new version release, while trying to keep up with the demand from people who need our help installing it. Your donation will go a long way to ensure that SecureDrop remains state of the art and deployed in as many newsrooms as possible.

Freedom of the Press Foundation

We’re a small non-profit organization with a mission to defend press freedoms in the digital age. If you donate to us directly it will help us cover operational expenses, expand and hire new staff, while also managing the SecureDrop project, and encouraging greater use of encryption and security practices by journalists, sources and news organizations around the world. With your help, we can do even more.

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